Rundamentals: Going Back to Basics Improved My Running Game

w: Johnathon E. Briggs

w: Johnathon E. Briggs

Rundamentals: Going Back to Basics Improved My Running Game

— November 14, 2021 —

Disclaimer: I received a free 8-week trial of Rundamentals in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.


How it started: With summer giving way to fall, I laced up my New Balance sneakers and hit the wooded trails near my home for my first run with Rundamentals, an eight-week running program designed for beginners that combines weekly videos and workout challenges with motivational text messages.

I’m not a newbie by any stretch, but the opportunity to go “back to basics” guided by a certified running coach (in this case a fellow named Matt Branigan) was appealing. I hadn’t had a dedicated running coach since my long-ago days as a track and field athlete.

On my first run back in September, I averaged a pace of 11:18 per mile over three miles. Not too shabby considering I felt out of shape and rusty. As a fortysomething father eager to shake off pandemic fatigue, I was just grateful my knees were still in the game.

My Chatsworth High School cross country days (1992).

How it went: Each week I received a text message from Matt to let me know that a new series of training  videos were ready to view in Kajabi, a free mobile app that allows you to watch instructional videos and save your progress. The videos covered everything from proper running form and breathing to speed work and nutrition.

Every video ended with an upbeat message from Matt who encouraged completing the weekly challenge over the course of four days, using the Nike Run Club app to track your progress.

During the challenge week, Matt sent personalized text messages with motivational messages and training tips.

Motivational text message from coach Matt Branigan.

The workouts were too basic for me, so I modified them a bit to challenge myself. For example, instead of running a mile on certain days as recommended, I ran three.

The biggest challenges I encountered during my program were the usual curveballs life throws at you: a surprise bout of sickness (thankfully not COVID); a hectic work schedule that caused me to skip workouts for several weeks; and the occasional fatigue of day-to-day parenting which can sap your drive to exercise.

I’m not sure what I’ll train for next, but my experience with Rundamentals reminded me that making time for self-care is fundamental.

To keep myself motivated, I gave myself a simple assignment: take a photo of your shirt after every run. This may sound silly, but it worked. I actually looked forward to snapping a picture of my “effort” for the day. If I didn’t run, I wouldn’t have evidence I was making progress toward regaining my running resilience.

Post-run pics (clockwise): Muhammad Ali (Under Armour), Truth (Truth Training), Chicago (Nike), You Deserve the Wrld (WrldInVsn), Nike, Puma.

The last challenge of my Rundamentals program was to run 3.1 miles (5K). I’m proud to say I completed the challenge on November 1 in 32 minutes and 24 seconds, an average pace of 10:20 per milenearly a minute faster than at the start of the program. I felt like my old self again: energetic and focused.

How it’s going: Fall is slowly but surely giving way to winter in the Chicago area, so I’ve moved to exercises I can do indoors: jump rope workouts and dumbbell weight training.

When I resume running again in the spring, I’ll be sure to check out the new programs offered by Advance Running, the company behind Rundamentals. As it turns out, Advance Running now offers guided training programs to help you complete a 10K, half marathon, or marathon.

I’m not sure what I’ll train for next, but my experience with Rundamentals reminded me that making time for self-care is fundamental.

If you’d like to try the Rundamentals program, use this link to enroll and enter code: EASYRUN to get 10% off. The next program starts Nov. 21.

Father on,


Credit: Banner image by Alexandra Tran on Unsplash




766 words

11.14.21

Johnathon E. BriggsHusband • Father • Storyteller • #BlackDadMagic • ΑΦΑ

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Input comment
Input name Input email

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

“They Call Me Dad” Explores Dimensions of Black Fatherhood

What I’m Reading: My August List of Books

9 Reasons You Should Watch Disney/Pixar’s “Loop”

Don't miss a post! Subscribe to Fatherhood@Forty via email.

© Legend - A Handcrafted Misfit Theme

Copyright © 2021 — Blank Canvas Studio, LLC | No use without permission

About

Few may know this, but twice as many dads of newborns today are now in the 40-plus age group, compared to the 1970s. Six weeks before my 40th birthday, I became a first-time father, hence the title of this blog.

This life-changing moment made me think about my own dad, who became a father at 43. As my parenthood journey unfolded, I noticed that most of my friends had become parents earlier in life yet, here I was, changing diapers and battling sleep deprivation at (nearly) 40. I told my wife, “Parenting is definitely a young man’s game.” But is it really?

Where most of my friends were preparing for their children’s middle and high school graduations, I was mastering the art of the swaddle, perfecting the one-hand baby wipe, and learning to decipher my daughter’s gurgles and whimpers. It occurred to me that I had so much more to offer my daughter at the sure-footed age of 40 than I did at, say, 28, when I was still coming into my own.

Fatherhood@Forty: Dispatches from the Parent Hood™ is a creative outlet to share my experiences and connect with other (relatively) late-in-life dads.

Here are a few factoids about me, Johnathon Briggs, the editor behind this blog:

  • I’m a former journalist (Los Angeles Times, The Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune).
  • I love exploring Chicago and the Midwest with my family.
  • I remain on a constant quest to stay fit.
  • I support charities that fight HIV, uplift families affected by incarceration, and ensure African American boys graduate from college.
  • I’m a comic book geek (mostly Marvel, but a bit of DC and Image Comics).
  • I’m a child of the ‘80s, so please expect occasional references to the Golden Age of Hip-Hop.

As a reporter for daily newspapers, I had the opportunity to interview fascinating people and to test out great products and brands for my readers. I hope to do the same for you as I blog about the moments that make up this adventure called fatherhood.

Feel free to tweet (@fatherhoodforty) or email (fatherhoodforty@gmail.com) me if you’d like to collaborate or have ideas for a blog post.

Father on,

P.S. Check out The Art of Conversation podcast interview I did with Art Eddy from Life of Dad.

 


Disclaimer: Fatherhood@Forty may contain affiliate marketing links, which may result in commission on sales of products or services I write about. My editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

A Family Portrait 46 Years In Making

Rundamentals: Going Back to Basics Improved My Running Game

A Juneteenth Father’s Day: The Meaning of Emancipation for Black Dads

Finding My Father While Preparing to Lose Him

Person of Interest: James Mosely – An Autistic Perspective Worth Reading

The Five Questions Interview: Jamiyl Samuels – Teaching Confidence Through Superheroes

“They Call Me Dad” Explores Dimensions of Black Fatherhood

The Death I Expected Wasn’t the Death that Found Me

A New, More Hopeful Chapter in America

The Talk: What Will I Tell My Black Child About Race?

View More

About

Few may know this, but twice as many dads of newborns today are now in the 40-plus age group, compared to the 1970s. Six weeks before my 40th birthday, I became a first-time father, hence the title of this blog.

This life-changing moment made me think about my own dad, who became a father at 43. As my parenthood journey unfolded, I noticed that most of my friends had become parents earlier in life yet, here I was, changing diapers and battling sleep deprivation at (nearly) 40. I told my wife, “Parenting is definitely a young man’s game.” But is it really?

Where most of my friends were preparing for their children’s middle and high school graduations, I was mastering the art of the swaddle, perfecting the one-hand baby wipe, and learning to decipher my daughter’s gurgles and whimpers. It occurred to me that I had so much more to offer my daughter at the sure-footed age of 40 than I did at, say, 28, when I was still coming into my own.

Fatherhood@Forty: Dispatches from the Parent Hood™ is a creative outlet to share my experiences and connect with other (relatively) late-in-life dads.

Here are a few factoids about me, Johnathon Briggs, the editor behind this blog:

  • I’m a former journalist (Los Angeles Times, The Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune).
  • I love exploring Chicago and the Midwest with my family.
  • I remain on a constant quest to stay fit.
  • I support charities that fight HIV, uplift families affected by incarceration, and ensure African American boys graduate from college.
  • I’m a comic book geek (mostly Marvel, but a bit of DC and Image Comics).
  • I’m a child of the ‘80s, so please expect occasional references to the Golden Age of Hip-Hop.

As a reporter for daily newspapers, I had the opportunity to interview fascinating people and to test out great products and brands for my readers. I hope to do the same for you as I blog about the moments that make up this adventure called fatherhood.

Feel free to tweet (@fatherhoodforty) or email (fatherhoodforty@gmail.com) me if you’d like to collaborate or have ideas for a blog post.

Father on,

P.S. Check out The Art of Conversation podcast interview I did with Art Eddy from Life of Dad.

 


Disclaimer: Fatherhood@Forty may contain affiliate marketing links, which may result in commission on sales of products or services I write about. My editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
Iris Awards Nominees 2021
Copyright © 2017-2021 Blank Canvas Studio, LLC | No use without permission